Curiosity scared the rhino
Curiosity scared the rhino
Curiosity scared the rhino
Curiosity scared the rhino
Curiosity scared the rhino
Curiosity scared the rhino
Curiosity scared the rhino
Curiosity scared the rhino
Curiosity scared the rhino
Curiosity scared the rhino
Curiosity scared the rhino

This little rhino appears to be looking for friends in the wild. An amazing interaction between a baby rhino and an adult warthog was captured by Wild editor Romi Boom.

Rhinos are curious by nature, there’s no doubt about that. I recently witnessed a prime example of this behaviour during my stay at Jock Safari Lodge in the Kruger National Park.

When our safari vehicle bumped into a rhino mom and her tiny baby, we decided to stay and watch. Ranger Dawid van Zyl switched off the engine and the guests sat back to enjoy the sighting of the peaceful twosome.

The little one was so small that its colouring was still very pale grey, a few shades lighter than that of its mother. Soon it became very interested in a grazing warthog that entered the scene. An adult male warthog weighs 68-72kg and has a shoulder height of 72cm.

As far as the rhino tyke was concerned, this guy appeared to be a match in size – considering that white rhinos weigh 40-60kg at birth, the two did in fact appear to be evenly matched in size and height.

We held our breaths as Baby approached the warthog, step by step. It was certainly not daunted, but curious and cautious in equal measure. Would curiosity get it into trouble? The suspense was incredible and we were all poised for a moment of high drama. Baby picked up its feet, ever so slowly, and it was possible to take photos showing the stalking process. Mom was not at all concerned.

Just when it looked as if Baby may have found a new best friend, the warthog dropped its head and in a blink, appeared to mock charge the rhino. That warning was sufficient for Baby to run back to mom. Curiosity killed the cat, they say, but in this instance it was a case of curiosity scared the rhino!

This sighting proved to be one of the most memorable during our pre-breakfast drive.

[Jock Safari Lodge does permit off road driving on the concession, but this is done in an environmentally responsible manner with each off road site being rehabilitated afterwards, as the damage a vehicle does to the veld takes up to two years to repair. The Lodge has been built to the most stringent eco-management criteria in South Africa and both its footprint and impact on the environment are audited by Kruger National Park and DEAT (Department of Environment and Tourism) on a bi-annual basis.]